Celebrate 50 Years of 'It's The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown' with Halloween Pins

Halloween pins can be spooky, scary, or fun, just like the rest of Halloween.  From haunted houses to pumpkin patches, there’s something for everyone during this holiday time.  The entertainment industry has a wide range of Halloween shows and movies as well.  And while scary horror films might abound, there’s a more family-friendly Halloween show that’s celebrating its 50th anniversary this year:  ‘It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’!

History of a classic

In the 1960s television networks didn’t consider Halloween worthy of having its own TV specials.  So when ‘It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’ first aired in October 1966 it was a huge risk.  But that risk paid off when the show became a hit.  Since its debut the animated classic, which was based on the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Shulz, has aired every year.  The story of Linus waiting for The Great Pumpkin secured the Peanuts gang’s place in television history, but other parts of the shows history might surprise you.  Here are some things you might not know about ‘It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’

It was almost the last Peanuts TV special.

‘It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’ was the third Peanuts TV special, and almost the last.  Network executives told producer Bill Mendelson that unless the show was a huge hit they wouldn’t buy any future Peanuts specials.  Luckily for Mendelson (and us) the cartoon was widely successful.  The popularity of the show led the way for Mendelson to produce more than 50 other Peanuts cartoons.

Viewers sent candy to Charlie Brown for years.

When the gang goes trick-or-treating, poor Charlie Brown ends up getting a bag of rocks instead of candy.  Kids who watched the show felt so bad for Charlie Brown that they mailed bags of candy to the network office addressed to the loveable blockhead.  Shulz, the Peanuts creator, also received candy at his office.

A loose tooth almost ruined the special.

The Peanuts characters are always voiced by children.  But having children as voice actors presents some challenges.  Kathy Steinberg, who voiced Sally, was almost replaced when the producers realized she had a loose tooth.  Worried that if the tooth fell out the resulting gap would cause a lisp, thus ruining the voiceover work, the y rushed her in to finish her lines.  Kathy’s tooth fell out the day after recording was finished.

Part of the 50th anniversary celebration will be Peanuts-themed corn mazes.

Over 80 farms in the United States will celebrate the 50th anniversary of ‘It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’ with corn mazes.  The MAiZE Inc helped to design mazes featuring Peanuts characters and inspired by the television special.

So this year, don’t let someone go home with a rock, have PinProsPlus create unique Halloween pins for you instead!  Halloween pins work great for handing out during trick-or-treating, or even to show your belief in The Great Pumpkin.